Divergent

I liked the Divergent trilogy.  I thought the movie did a relatively good job of bringing Veronica Roth’s world to the big screen.

More importantly, I liked how the story applies to today.

I like that the world of Divergent is well thought out.  The factions (Abnegation, Erudite, Amity, Candor, and Dauntless) are a great way to strip human nature and personality to five core elements and that intrigued me.  It made me see my world in more black and white terms in positive and negative ways.

Divergent, like many other stories, takes readers and viewers to a not-so-distant future where the world functions in a different reality. There is usually a terrible plague or war and the world has had to pick up the pieces by instituting control and regulations all for the “good of the people” and to “keep the peace”.

I have always thought that these stories are not all about the future.  They deal with problems we see every day.  Russia and Crimea. Violence in Brazil.  A missing airplane.  Terrorism.

The biggest mistake we can make when we read these stories is to think, “That sure is a great story,” and walk away from it without thinking about how it should affect the way we live today.  We do not live inside a wall or in a world with carefully rearranged factions or districts.  

But we do live in a time where we have to decide what we believe and where we stand on difficult and pressing issues.  What are the root causes of terrorism?  Why are citizens rebelling against they’re own governments?  Why is equality so important?

It might sound dramatic and far fetched, but I believe that if we do not answer these questions today, we run the risk of facing the futures written in these stories much sooner than we think.

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